Cleaning up the Detroit River

2020 was another good year for habitat restoration and sediment investigation on the Detroit River but water levels created some unexpected issues.  While 2020 was different and unique for many reasons, progress was still made for habitat restoration and sediment investigation on the Detroit River. The Detroit River is one of 27 remaining U.S. Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes Basin. It was a busy year for habitat restoration for Michigan Sea Grant (MISG) and our partners, such as the Friends of the Detroit River (FDR). Although some projects were delayed due to COVID-19 or high water levels, most projects finished the year on schedule: 

Celeron Island

Celeron Island is part of the Detroit River Conservation Crescent near the southern end of Grosse Ile. The Celeron Island habitat restoration project was bid out in the fall of 2018, construction began in the spring of 2019 and was completed in 2020. The project has added nearly 4,000 linear feet of shoals with a sand bar for nesting turtles, snake hibernacula, and common tern nesting areas. The shoals also protect over 100 acres of coastal wetlands with additional spawning habitat to encourage a robust fish population.


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Fish wholesaler gets year for illegal trout

CHARLEVOIX, Mich. (AP) — A fish wholesaler in northern Michigan has been sentenced to a year in custody after pleading guilty to acquiring trout that were illegally caught in the Great Lakes.

Federal Judge Paul Maloney says John Cross III of Charlevoix can serve his sentence in the off-season. He appeared in court Monday, months after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor.

The government says Cross and his business, Cross Fisheries, bought about 50,000 pounds of lake trout from a fisherman who was using so-called trap nets. Those fish should have been thrown back into the water.

Separately, Cross’ business pleaded guilty to a felony. The judge will hold another hearing to determine a financial penalty.

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Share your thoughts with the DNR at upcoming meetings

March 21, 2019

Share your thoughts with the DNR at upcoming meetings

The Department of Natural Resources is committed to providing Michigan citizens the opportunity to share input and ideas on policy decisions, programs and other aspects of natural resource management and outdoor recreation opportunities. One important avenue for this input is at meetings of the public bodies that advise the DNR and, in some cases, also set policies for natural resource management

Conversations and Coffee fisheries meetings

In addition, the public is invited to join DNR Fisheries Division staff at Conversations & Coffee events this spring for an informal opportunity to discuss local issues and management activities, and to get specific questions answered. More information is available at www.Michigan.gov/Fishing or by contacting Elyse Walter at 517-284-5839.

  • April 2, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Tahquamenon Area Public Library, Newberry
  • April 4, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Holiday Inn Express Munising-Lakeview, Munising
  • April 8, 6 to 8 p.m., Wolf Lake State Fish Hatchery Visitor Center, Mattawan
  • April 9, 2 to 3 p.m., webinar for those interested in southern Lake Huron waters, register online
  • April 9, 6:30 p.m., Bay City State Park Visitor Center, Bay City
  • April 10, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Waterford Fisheries Station, Waterford
  • April 16, 6 p.m., Lake Superior State University, Sault Ste. Marie
  • April 23, 6 to 8 p.m. (CDT), Gogebic Community College, Ironwood
  • April 24, 7 to 9 p.m., Ishpeming Township Hall, Ishpeming
  • April 25, 7 to 9 p.m., Portage Lake District Library, Houghton

April meetings

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Boating Safety Certificate Advocates urge boaters to ‘Spring Aboard’ this season

Michigan Boating Safety Certificate

Online or classroom

www.boat-ed.com/michigan

www.boaterexam.com/usa/michigan

The reminder is in line with the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators Spring Aboard – Take a Boating Education Course campaign (March 17-23). Many states require completion of a NASBLA-verified course to rent or operate a powerboat. In Michigan, boaters born after June 30, 1996, must have a boating safety certificate to operate a boat, and boaters born after Dec. 31, 1978, need a boating safety certificate to operate a personal watercraft.

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Perch Fishing Report Lake Erie MIchigan 08-17-2018

Perch fishing has been on again off again all this week. Best bets in Michigan are the Michigan dump, between the dump and the Raisin River, also between the Raisin River buoys and Stoney Point in 24′ of water. E buoy and C buoy were producing  last weekend. I have not fished E or C in over a week. This general area has been good for me. A word of caution! if you venture over the line you will get stopped and checked by the Ohio DNR. I’ve been checked this week only being over the line a few hundred yards near E buoy! I see many small boats race out not knowing they are over the line when they see charter boats fishing. The end result, they received tickets for not possessing an Ohio fishing license. 

Perch Fishing charter Stray Cat Fishing Charters, near Monroe Michigan

Her first Lake Erie Yellow Perch

If you see a pack of boats perch fishing it does not necessarily mean they are catching perch. Boats attract boats! If you see a boat catching perch don’t pull up and fish on top of them! The likelihood of you pulling that boats fish to you are usually “O”. Best bet is to slowly cruse the area using your graph, sometimes you will only mark small amounts of fish on or near the bottom. Set up and fish for them, give it 20 minutes or so. Sometimes the perch start off biting slow but more will fish be attracted to the activity and the bite will improve.   If your bite does not improve move a few hundred yards. I’ve moved up 6 or 7 times in a 1 mile area before I found a good school on the feed. You will feel and be more successful if you find your own fish.

Dispute sharpens over spearfishing on Lake St. Clair

ST. CLAIR SHORES, Mich. — The international boundary between the United States and Canada cuts a diagonal through the vast 430-square-mile Lake St. Clair, regarded by some as the sixth Great Lake and by many as one of the best muskellunge fisheries in the world.

Many states allow the spearing of rough fish, but Michigan is unique, one of the few places that permits taking gamefish with a spear. There are reams of exclusions protecting primarily trout waters and boundary waters, but for the most part Michigan allows northern pike and muskellunge to be speared through the ice from Dec. 1 to March 15 on many of its waters.

Lake St. Clair, the St. Clair River, the Detroit River, and Lake Erie are closed to spearing muskies but open for the same period to spear pike and yellow perch.Muskie Lake Erie

A proposal to consider taking Lake St. Clair off the muskie spearing sanctuary list is bouncing around inside the Michigan Natural Resources Commission and has been fodder for intense debate at several recent informal forums on the matter. The commission, appointed by the governor, reviews proposals for changes or additions to the rules that regulate the taking of game and sportfish, and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources would ultimately carry out those measures.

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Michigan Free Fishing weekend February 17, 18, 2018

Everyone in Michigan is invited to fish for free Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 17 and 18, for the 2018 Winter Free Fishing Weekend. A license is not required to fish those two days, but all other fishing regulations still apply.

Free FIshing Weekend

Free Fishing Weekend Feb> 17, 18, 2018

These two days make up #MiFreeFishingWeekend – an annual effort to promote Michigan’s world-class fishing opportunities. While many individuals and families will bundle up and head out to fish for free on their own, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources points out that there are many events organized throughout the state to get you started, too. Here are a few: read more

Michigan Arctic Grayling habitat research

$117,175 grant from the

Recently completed work supported by this grant addressed two immediate needs for a successful Arctic grayling reintroduction. The first was to collect stream habitat and fish community data in the upper Manistee River. This data collection allowed for both the evaluation of current stream habitat conditions and the development of criteria to determine which other streams may provide suitable habitat for Arctic grayling.Arctic Grayling Fishing

Michigan’s Arctic Grayling Initiative is a statewide partnership effort focused on restoring self-sustaining populations of this native fish and was founded by the DNR and the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians in June 2016. Interest in this initiative has grown rapidly since 2016, and the partnership now includes more than 40 organizations.

For more information on Michigan’s Arctic Grayling Initiative, visit migrayling.org.

Michigan Free Fishing Weekend this February 2018

Experience #MiFreeFishingWeekend Feb. 17-18 and enjoy the outdoors

Grab a fishing rod and enjoy some of the finest fishing Michigan has to offer during the 2018 Winter Free Fishing Weekend Saturday, Feb. 17, and Sunday, Feb. 18. On those two days, everyone – residents and non-residents alike – can fish without a license, though all other fishing regulations still apply.

In addition, during #MiFreeFishingWeekend, the Department of Natural Resources will waive the regular Recreation Passport entry fee that grants vehicle access to Michigan’s 103 state parks and recreation areas. Several locations also may be hosting official 2018 Winter Free Fishing Weekend events that are perfect for the whole family.

Michigan has been celebrating winter’s #MiFreeFishingWeekend every year since 1994 as a way to promote awareness of the state’s vast aquatic resources. With more than 3,000 miles of Great Lakes shoreline, tens of thousands of miles of rivers and streams, and 11,000 inland lakes, Michigan and fishing are a perfect match.

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Wetlands a vital resource for Michigan’s wildlife

Michigan Department of Natural Resources

When thinking about Michigan’s important, valuable landscapes, many of us first think of the Great Lakes, northern forests and sandy beaches. Wetlands might not immediately come to mind.

They certainly didn’t for early Michigan settlers, who were less than impressed with the state’s abundance of swamps and marshes – more than 10 million acres of wetlands before European settlement.

Michigan Waterfowl Youth Hunt, Point Mouille

Waterfowl Youth Hunt, Point Mouille

 

 

 

 

 

 

The banks of the Detroit River are handsome, but nine-tenths of the land in the Territory is unfit for cultivation,” said General Duncan McArthur, stationed at Fort Detroit, in 1814.

The 1816 Tiffin Report by Edward Tiffin, surveyor general of the United States, had equally disparaging things to say about Michigan’s land and agricultural potential, including: “Michigan apparently consisted of swamps, lakes, and poor, sandy soil not worth the cost of surveying. Not more than one acre in a hundred, or perhaps a thousand, could be cultivated.”

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